In the spirit of Joseph Welch (who was speaking during the infamous Senate McCarthy hearings), I say the following to the horseracing industry: “Have you no sense of decency, sirs? At long last, have you left no sense of decency?”

This sentiment could easily apply to virtually anything I’ve published on these pages. But my outrage is particularly piqued today after seeing this on the website of the “National Museum of Racing and Hall of Fame” in Saratoga:

Health, History, and Horses: This program, designed for fourth grade, offers classroom instruction, museum visits, and field trip opportunities that will enhance your students’ learning. Core courses include Horsing Around with History: a tour of the Oklahoma Training Track and a tour of the museum with a focus on local history, science and careers.

Target Audience: Fourth Grade
Program Category: School Program
Duration: We suggest a minimum of 3 hours for this field trip.

Horse Explorers Children’s Program: Recommended for ages 3-6, “Horse Explorers” is a hands-on series intended to creatively educate children about horses by developing age-appropriate skills in disciplines including art, literacy, science and math. The program will be staffed by the Museum’s professional educators. “Horse Explorers” will take place Thursday mornings in the Museum’s Horseplay Gallery. Children are free to attend with a paid accompanying adult.

Look, I realize that the notion of ethics in horseracing is fundamentally fantastical. Racing exploits (abuses), maims, and destroys multiple thousands of horses every year – for gambling. But to bring young children, as innocent as the animals they’re to be “taught” about, into this reaches new depths of depravity. Then again, it should not surprise: This industry is clearly in decline. Much of it is being kept afloat by subsidies; it is not attracting younger bettors – partly because of competition (casinos, lotteries), partly because of rapidly changing sensibilities toward animals (Ringling, SeaWorld). In other words, they’re desperate. Hence, “field trips” to the “Oklahoma Training Track” – where, by the way, 11 horses were killed last summer alone – and “professional educators” plying their trade on toddlers. For shame.

How is it that the state of California can publish this list of horses who died in the San Luis fire but ever refuses my annual FOIA request for the names of their track kills?

2016: “The CHRB has not changed its policy and therefore cannot provide a list of racehorses that died or were euthanized on or at California race tracks…the name of the horse…is considered confidential.”

2015: “The CHRB cannot provide a list of racehorses that died or were euthanized on or at California race tracks…the name of the horse…is considered confidential.”

2014: same basic response.

Appears to me that this recent transparency is a rather transparent attempt to arouse sympathy and support for the affected racing-people and, by extension, the racing industry at large. In other words, vile. As usual.

Highlights from a recent report by the New York State Comptroller’s Office:

In October 2011, Resorts World New York City Casino (Resorts) opened adjacent to Aqueduct Racetrack. According to NYRA’s Franchise Agreement (Agreement), a percentage of Resorts’ Video Lottery Terminal (VLT) revenue is directed to NYRA for enhanced purses, operational support, and capital expenditures. The Agreement directs that NYRA receive VLT funding until 2033 unless the franchise is terminated before that time. However, the FOB stressed the need for NYRA to develop a plan to become profitable without reliance on VLT subsidies.

NYRA’s overall financial condition, as a result of VLT revenue subsidies, is sound. However, NYRA’s traditional racing operations (which exclude the VLT revenues) have generated multimillion dollar annual deficits. Excluding VLT revenues, NYRA would have generated cumulative operating losses of $109.3 million from 2010 through 2014 (or an average annual loss of about $22 million). Moreover, NYRA has not developed a sufficient plan to make operations profitable without VLT subsidies.

Translation: VLT subsidies make NYRA – which in addition to Aqueduct, includes more prestigious Saratoga and Belmont – profitable. Without them, Thoroughbred racing in NY is failing. (Cheap Finger Lakes also stays in the black through racino cash; all seven harness tracks, too. In fact, I hold that sans racinos, those eight would have been shuttered by now.) Failing – at a clip of about $22 million/year.

aqueduct-race-track-casino

End the corporate welfare, NY. And if Horseracing can no longer subsist on its product alone – and it clearly cannot – let it go the way of myriad other American industries that time passed by. As a further incentive, the Empire State will no longer be in the business of sanctioning equine cruelty/killing. Imagine that.

(Previous post on NY’s racinos – “Feeding at the Slots Trough”)