The following horses were ambulanced – “vanned,” they call it – off U.S. (flat) tracks last week. While true that not all of the “vanned off” end up dead, rest assured that many, if not most, of these names will resurface on my year-end FOIA kill reports.

J Be K’s Sonnet, Delaware
Rolling Star, Zia
Vegamin, Belterra
Banking, Thistledown
Outlaw Angel, Charles Town
Sundance Flyer, Remington
Colonel Slewie, Remington
Purrfect of Course, Santa Anita
Capriza, Indiana
Favorite Dawn, Los Alamitos
Stelthy, Prairie
Donnie’s Cool Cat, Remington
Bodacious Giggles, Zia, not reported as vanned but “fell, DNF”

In addition, these horses were reported as “bled” or “returned bleeding from the nostrils”; this usually indicates pulmonary hemorrhage. Pulmonary hemorrhage.

Maxana, Finger Lakes
Tug of War, Belmont
Lac Ofcomunication, Mountaineer (also “vanned off”)

(source: Equibase)

The Kentucky chartwriters are loath (and loathe) to give up that state’s dead. A “euthanized” in the notes is practically unheard of; “broke down” – racing’s euphemism of choice for dead – is almost as rare. But of course when it’s an expensive horse in a big race, word gets out. Yesterday, the 2-year-old, $100,000-earning (in only four races) colt Ten City was a “went wrong, pulled up, vanned off” in the $500,000 Grade 1 Claiborne Futurity at Keeneland. Alas, Ten City is dead – euthanized, according to multiple sources, back in the barn.

Typical, too, in these matters are the revolting reactions that follow. Ten City’s trainer, Kenny McPeek, in a tweet:

“Yesterday was very very hard…In 32 years training, I’ve never lost a horse with such talent in such an important race. Hard to understand. Thank You for the notes of support and we will keep doing our best in a tough game. See you at the races.”

“Very very hard.”

“Never lost a horse with such talent.” (presumably he has lost other “lesser” horses)

“Hard to understand.”

“Will keep doing our best in a tough game.”

And my favorite: “See you [for more].”

Vile. Horseracing.

Recent kills…

8-year-old Wildcat Honey in the 5th at Mountaineer September 26. While the chart merely said “pulled up, vanned off,” I have confirmed that Wildcat was euthanized on the track. On death-day (her 54th time under the whip), she was going for $5,000.

3-year-old El Soborno in the 2nd at Mountaineer October 3. As with Wildcat, El Soborno was euthanized where he lay – after, that is, “[taking] a bad step.”

5-year-old Princess Bossy in the 6th at Belterra October 4. Beginning June 21 and ending with her death October 4, this mare had a string of 10th of 11, 6th of 7, 9th of 10, 7th of 9, 6th of 7 – all in cheap claiming races.

And just last night, 3-year-old Falcon’s Chance in the 5th at Saratoga Harness from what the Gaming Commission says was a fractured pastern and fetlock.

Four more dead animals for $2 bets – this is horseracing.

Hidden Talent, a 2-year-old QuarterHorse, won her first ever race Saturday at Lone Star. Then she died. The video is shocking, among the worst I’ve seen. First, though, this from a reader who was at that race:

“I joined a friend at Lone Star Park last night because she wanted to see the horses in person for the first time. This will be her last trip to the racetrack. In race three the winner broke down right at the wire and was euthanized on the track in front of hundreds of horrified spectators. I saw several children in tears as the curtain came out to hide from view what I knew was going to be the unfortunate death of another race horse. There was no mention after the event of the unfortunate demise of an unwilling participant – only the condition of the jockey. This is horse racing. I won’t be back.”

The kill happens right after the wire; please watch, then share…
http://www.lonestarpark.com/Racing/Race_Video/ – “Replays,” Sa the 30th, race 3

The following horses were ambulanced – “vanned,” they call it – off U.S. (flat) tracks last week. While true that not all of the “vanned off” end up dead, rest assured that many, if not most, of these names will resurface on my year-end FOIA kill reports.

Aztec Delite, Louisiana
United Ocala, Thistledown
Strollin Willie, Louisiana
Jordano, Mountaineer
Wildcat Honey, Mountaineer
Dancing Wind, Gulfstream
Retrade, Presque Isle (after “collapsing”)
Jester’s Judgement, Thistledown, not reported as vanned but “pulled up injured”
Big Tire, Thistledown
Man of Stature, Churchill
Baby Antonella, Gulfstream
Hocus Pocus Cat, Presque Isle
Ocean Ahumin, Remington
El Capitan, Will Rogers
Tizquick, Belterra (“in distress”)
Your Way, Churchill
Judys Girl, Energy
Empire Image, Finger Lakes (“in distress”)
May B Drama, Gulfstream
Awake the Day, Laurel
Wynnpaul, Remington
Altanero, Zia
Jess a Tres, Zia
Sir Sebastian, Gulfstream
Jr Kaweahs Dynasty, Prairie

In addition, these horses were reported as “bled” or “returned bleeding from the nostrils”; this usually indicates pulmonary hemorrhage. Pulmonary hemorrhage.

Glorious Empire, Laurel
Bladerunner, Thistledown
Dashing for Jewel

(source: Equibase)